U.S. Level III and IV Ecoregions (U.S. EPA)

Metadata Updated: March 31, 2016

This map service displays Level III and Level IV Ecoregions of the United States and was created from ecoregion data obtained from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Research and Development's Western Ecology Division. The original ecoregion data was projected from Albers to Web Mercator for this map service. To download shapefiles of ecoregion data (in Albers), please go to: www.epa.gov/wed/pages/ecoregions.htm. IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUT LEVEL IV POLYGON LEGEND DISPLAY IN ARCMAP: Due to the limitations of Graphical Device Interface (GDI) resources per application on Windows, ArcMap does not display the legend in the Table of Contents for the ArcGIS Server service layer if the legend has more than 100 items. As of December 2011, there are 968 unique legend items in the Level IV Ecoregion Polygon legend. Follow this link (http://support.esri.com/en/knowledgebase/techarticles/detail/33741) for instructions about how to increase the maximum number of ArcGIS Server service layer legend items allowed for display in ArcMap. Note the instructions at this link provide a slightly incorrect path to "Maximum Legend Count". The correct path is HKEY_CURRENT_USER > Software > ESRI > ArcMap > Server > MapServerLayer > Maximum Legend Count. When editing the "Maximum Legend Count", update the field, "Value data" to 1000. To download a PDF version of the Level IV ecoregion map and legend, go to ftp://ftp.epa.gov/wed/ecoregions/us/Eco_Level_IV_US_pg.pdf. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across federal agencies, state agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources within the same geographical areas. The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions can be identified through the analysis of patterns of biotic and abiotic phenomena, including geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels for ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 52 regions (Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group, 1997). At Level III, the continental United States contains 104 regions whereas the conterminous United States has 85 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2005). Level IV ecoregions (n = 968) are further subdivisions of Level III ecoregions. Methods used to define the ecoregions are explained in Omernik (1995, 2004), Omernik and others (2000), and Gallant and others (1989). Literature cited: Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group, 1997, Ecological regions of North America- toward a common perspective: Montreal, Commission for Environmental Cooperation, 71 p. Gallant, A.L., Whittier, T.R., Larsen, D.P., Omernik, J.M., and Hughes, R.M., 1989, Regionalization as a tool for managing environmental resources: Corvallis, Oregon, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, EPA/600/3-89/060, 152p. Omernik, J.M., 1995, Ecoregions - a framework for environmental management, in Davis, W.S. and Simon, T.P., eds., Biological assessment and criteria-tools for water resource planning and decision making: Boca Raton, Florida, Lewis Publishers, p.49-62. Omernik, J.M., Chapman, S.S., Lillie, R.A., and Dumke, R.T., 2000, Ecoregions of Wisconsin: Transactions of the Wisconsin Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, v. 88, p. 77-103. Omernik, J.M., 2004, Perspectives on the nature and definitions of ecological regions: Environmental Management, v. 34, Supplement 1, p. s27-s38. Comments and questions regarding ecoregion development should be addressed to Glenn Griffith, Dynamac Corporation, c/o US EPA., 200 SW 35th Street, Corvallis, OR 97333, 541-754-4465, email:griffith.glenn@epa.gov Alternate: James Omernik, USGS, c/o US EPA, 200 SW 35th Street, Corvallis, OR 97333, 541-754-4458, email:omernik.james@epa.gov

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Dates

Metadata Date January 1, 9999
Metadata Created Date January 12, 2016
Metadata Updated Date March 31, 2016
Reference Date(s) April 26, 2012 (publication)
Frequency Of Update asNeeded

Metadata Source

Harvested from Environmental Dataset Gateway FGDC CSDGM

Additional Metadata

Resource Type Dataset
Metadata Date January 1, 9999
Metadata Created Date January 12, 2016
Metadata Updated Date March 31, 2016
Reference Date(s) April 26, 2012 (publication)
Responsible Party U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park (Point of Contact)
Contact Email
Access Constraints Use Constraints: None. Please check sources, scale, accuracy, currency and other available information. Please confirm that you are using the most recent copy of both data and metadata. Acknowledgement of the EPA would be appreciated., Access Constraints: None.
Bbox East Long -64
Bbox North Lat 50
Bbox South Lat 17
Bbox West Long -160
Coupled Resource
Frequency Of Update asNeeded
Guid
Harvest Object Id 05285c09-219a-4041-8b5d-93da355ef977
Harvest Source Id d0d72986-7693-406b-b71d-840540909711
Harvest Source Title Environmental Dataset Gateway FGDC CSDGM
Licence http://edg.epa.gov/EPA_Data_License.html
Licence Url http://edg.epa.gov/EPA_Data_License.html
Metadata Language
Metadata Type geospatial
Progress underDevelopment
Spatial Data Service Type
Spatial Reference System
Spatial Harvester True

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