Recreational freshwater fishing drives non-native aquatic species richness patterns at a continental scale

Metadata Updated: November 12, 2020

Aim. Mapping the geographic distribution of non-native aquatic species is a critically important precursor to understanding the anthropogenic and environmental factors that drive freshwater biological invasions. Such efforts are often limited to local scales and/or to single species, due to the challenges of data acquisition at larger scales. Here we map the distribution of exotic freshwater species richness across the continental United States and investigate the role of human activity in driving macroscale patterns of aquatic invasion.

Location. The continental United States.

Methods. We assembled maps of non-native aquatic species richness by compiling occurrence data on exotic animal and plant species from publicly accessible databases. Using a dasymetric model of human population density and a spatially explicit model of recreational freshwater fishing demand we analyzed the effect of these metrics of human influence on the degree of invasion at the watershed scale, while controlling for spatial and sampling bias. We also assessed the effects that a temporal mismatch between occurrence data (collected since 1815) and cross-sectional predictors (developed using 2010 data) may have on model fit.

Results. Non-native aquatic species richness exhibits a highly patchy distribution, with hotspots in the Northeast, Great Lakes, Florida, and human population centers on the Pacific coast. These richness patterns are correlated with population density, but are much more strongly predicted by patterns of recreational fishing demand. These relationships are strengthened by temporal matching of datasets and are robust to corrections for sampling effort.

Main Conclusions. Distributions of aquatic invasive species across the continental US are better predicted by freshwater recreational fishing than by human population density. This suggests that observed patterns are driven by a mechanistic link between recreational activity and aquatic invasive species richness, and are not merely the outcome of sampling bias associated with human population density.

This dataset is associated with the following publication: Davis, A., and J. Darling. Recreational freshwater fishing drives non-native aquatic species richness patterns at a continental scale (journal). Diversity and Distributions. Blackwell Publishing Limited, Oxford, UK, 23(6): 692-702, (2017).

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Public: This dataset is intended for public access and use. License: See this page for license information.

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References

https://doi.org/10.1111/ddi.12557

Dates

Metadata Created Date November 12, 2020
Metadata Updated Date November 12, 2020

Metadata Source

Harvested from EPA ScienceHub

Additional Metadata

Resource Type Dataset
Metadata Created Date November 12, 2020
Metadata Updated Date November 12, 2020
Publisher U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development (ORD)
Unique Identifier Unknown
Maintainer
Identifier https://doi.org/10.23719/1377814
Data Last Modified 2017-06-14
Public Access Level public
Bureau Code 020:00
Schema Version https://project-open-data.cio.gov/v1.1/schema
Data Dictionary https://pasteur.epa.gov/uploads/10.23719/1377814/documents/JohnDarling_A-c86j_DDmetadata_20170831.xml
Data Dictionary Type application/xml
Harvest Object Id 710f9ef0-7719-40f0-a51a-3b8a1211dbda
Harvest Source Id 04b59eaf-ae53-4066-93db-80f2ed0df446
Harvest Source Title EPA ScienceHub
License https://pasteur.epa.gov/license/sciencehub-license.html
Program Code 020:097
Publisher Hierarchy U.S. Government > U.S. Environmental Protection Agency > U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development (ORD)
Related Documents https://doi.org/10.1111/ddi.12557
Source Datajson Identifier True
Source Hash a06cfc473f4bbd6e2300b0ea3aec42c5fdbf96dc
Source Schema Version 1.1

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