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Multi-Hazard Inundation With 0.5-m Sea Level Rise: Honolulu, Hawaii

Metadata Updated: November 11, 2023

Multi-hazard inundation around Honolulu, Hawaii resulting from future sea level rise. The study area includes the urban corridor stretching from Honolulu International Airport to Waikiki and Diamond Head along the south shore of Oahu. Shows inundation from the following three hazards:

1) Sea Level Rise Inundation: 0.5-m Scenario

Coastal flooding due to 0.5 meter of sea level rise. This scenario was derived using a National Geospatial Agency (NGA)-provided digital elevation model (DEM) based on LiDAR data of the Honolulu area collected in 2009. This "bare earth" DEM (vegetation and structures removed) was used to represent the current topography of the study area. The accuracy of the DEM was validated using a selection of 16 Tidal Benchmarks located within the study area. The single value tidal water surface of mean higher high water (MHHW) modeled at the Honolulu tide gauge was used to represent sea level for the purposes of this study. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides).

2) Tsunami Run-Up Inundation With 0.5-m Sea Level Rise

Computer model simulation of tsunami run-up inundation including half a meter of sea level rise at mean higher high water (MHHW) as its baseline water level. The model simulates maximum inundation based on five major historical tsunamis that have impacted Hawaii: 1) The 1946 Aleutian earthquake (8.2 Mw), 2) 1952 Kamchatka earthquake (9.0 Mw), 3) 1957 Aleutian earthquake (8.6 Mw), 4) 1960 Chile earthquake (9.5 Mw), and 5) the 1964 Alaska earthquake (9.2 Mw).

3) Hurricane Storm Surge Inundation With 0.5-m Sea Level Rise

Computer model simulation of hurricane storm surge inundation including half a meter of sea level rise at mean higher high water (MHHW) as its baseline water level. The model simulates a Category 4 hurricane, similar to Hurricane Iniki which devastated the island of Kauai in 1992, with a central pressure ranging from 910 to 970 mbar and maximum sustained winds ranging from 90 to 150 mph as it tracked from open ocean to land to open ocean again. The model result shows the Maximum of the Maximum Envelope of High Water (MEOW), or MOM, providing a worst-case snapshot for a particular storm category under "perfect" storm conditions.

Data produced in 2014 by Dr. Charles "Chip" Fletcher of the department of Geology & Geophysics (G&G) (1) and Dr. Kwok Fai Cheung of the department of Ocean and Resources Engineering (ORE) (2 & 3) in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Supported in part by the NOAA Coastal Storms Program (CSP) and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program. These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation depths and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Access & Use Information

License: No license information was provided. If this work was prepared by an officer or employee of the United States government as part of that person's official duties it is considered a U.S. Government Work.

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Dates

Metadata Date March 30, 2021
Metadata Created Date November 12, 2020
Metadata Updated Date November 11, 2023
Reference Date(s) September 26, 2014 (creation), September 26, 2014 (issued), September 26, 2014 (revision)
Frequency Of Update

Metadata Source

Harvested from ioos

Graphic Preview

Sample image.

Additional Metadata

Resource Type Dataset
Metadata Date March 30, 2021
Metadata Created Date November 12, 2020
Metadata Updated Date November 11, 2023
Reference Date(s) September 26, 2014 (creation), September 26, 2014 (issued), September 26, 2014 (revision)
Responsible Party University of Hawaii at Manoa (Point of Contact)
Contact Email
Guid hi_csp_hono_allflood_slrhm
Access Constraints
Bbox East Long -157.783239121617
Bbox North Lat 21.3583949284824
Bbox South Lat 21.254869768694
Bbox West Long -157.968633781198
Coupled Resource [{"title": [], "href": ["#DataIdentification"], "uuid": []}, {"title": [], "href": ["#DataIdentification"], "uuid": []}, {"title": [], "href": ["#DataIdentification"], "uuid": []}]
Frequency Of Update
Graphic Preview Description Sample image.
Graphic Preview File http://pacioos.org/metadata/browse/hi_csp_hono_allflood_slrhm.png
Harvest Object Id da39878e-743c-4647-8a54-95e138a31e37
Harvest Source Id 54e15a6e-6dde-4c9c-a8f0-345cc0dfccfb
Harvest Source Title ioos
Licence
Lineage 2014-09-26T00:00:00Z OGC web services (WMS and WFS) enabled by PacIOOS via GeoServer. Original data from source provider may have been reformatted, reprojected, or adjusted in other ways to optimize these capabilities.
Metadata Language eng
Metadata Type geospatial
Old Spatial {"type": "Polygon", "coordinates": [[[-157.968633781198, 21.254869768694], [-157.783239121617, 21.254869768694], [-157.783239121617, 21.3583949284824], [-157.968633781198, 21.3583949284824], [-157.968633781198, 21.254869768694]]]}
Progress
Spatial Data Service Type Open Geospatial Consortium Web Feature Service (WFS)
Spatial Reference System
Spatial Harvester True

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