Huron River near Hamburg, Michigan, flood-inundation model and field data

Metadata Updated: August 13, 2020

Digital flood-inundation maps for an 8-mile (mi) reach of the Huron River from downstream of Rickett Road to Strawberry Lake, Michigan, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with Green Oak and Hamburg Townships, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The flood-inundation maps also include a 1.16-mi reach of the Ore Lake Tributary until it joins the Huron River, approximately 2.22 mi downstream of Rickett Road. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on the Huron River near Hamburg, Michigan (station number 04172000). Near real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/. The NWS Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service also provides forecasted flood hydrographs at this web site. Flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the current stage-discharge relation at the Huron River near Hamburg, Mich., streamgage and was calibrated to water levels determined with stage sensors (pressure transducers) temporarily deployed along the stream reach. The hydraulic model was used to compute a set of water-surface profiles for flood stages ranging from 7.0 to 10.5 feet (ft). This range represents stages just above 6.0 (bankfull) to 2.04 ft above the maximum recorded stage at the USGS streamgage on the Huron River near Hamburg, Mich. (station number 04172000). The computed water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System digital elevation model (derived from light detection and ranging [lidar] data having a 0.49-ft vertical accuracy and 3.8-ft horizontal resolution) to delineate the area flooded at each water level. The availability of these maps, along with Internet information regarding current stage and forecasted high-flow stages from the NWS, will provide emergency management personnel and residents with information critical for flood-response activities such as evacuations, road closures, and postflood recovery efforts.

Access & Use Information

License: No license information was provided. If this work was prepared by an officer or employee of the United States government as part of that person's official duties it is considered a U.S. Government Work.

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Dates

Metadata Date March 27, 2018
Metadata Created Date January 29, 2020
Metadata Updated Date August 13, 2020
Reference Date(s) January 1, 2018 (publication)
Frequency Of Update notPlanned
Frequency Of Update notPlanned

Metadata Source

Harvested from DOI Open Data

Additional Metadata

Resource Type Dataset
Metadata Date March 27, 2018
Metadata Created Date January 29, 2020
Metadata Updated Date August 13, 2020
Reference Date(s) January 1, 2018 (publication)
Responsible Party Midwest Region (Point of Contact)
Contact Email
Access Constraints Use Constraints: Although the flood-inundation maps represent the boundaries of inundated areas with a distinct line, some uncertainty is associated with these maps. The flood boundaries shown were estimated on the basis of water stages and streamflows at selected USGS stream gages. Water-surface elevations along the stream reaches were estimated by steady-state hydraulic modeling, assuming unobstructed flow, and using streamflows and hydrologic conditions anticipated at the USGS streamgage. The hydraulic model reflects the land-cover characteristics and any bridge, dam, levee, or other hydraulic structures existing as of December 2015. Unique meteorological factors (timing and distribution of precipitation) may cause actual streamflows along the modeled reach to vary from those assumed during a flood, which may lead to deviations in the water-surface elevations and inundation boundaries shown. Additional areas may be flooded due to unanticipated conditions such as changes in the streambed elevation or roughness, backwater into major tributaries along a main stem river, or backwater from localized debris or ice jams. The accuracy of the floodwater extent portrayed on these maps will vary with the accuracy of the digital elevation model used to simulate the land surface. If this library of flood-inundation maps will be used in conjunction with NWS river forecasts, the user should be aware of additional uncertainties that may be inherent or factored into NWS forecast procedures. The NWS uses forecast models to estimate the quantity and timing of water flowing through selected stream reaches in the United States. These forecast models (1) estimate the amount of runoff generated by precipitation and snowmelt, (2) simulate the movement of floodwater as it proceeds downstream, and (3) predict the flow and stage (and water-surface elevation) for the stream at a given location (AHPS forecast point) throughout the forecast period (every 6 hours and 3 to 5 days out in many locations). For more information on AHPS forecasts, see: http://water.weather.gov/ahps/pcpn_and_river_forecasting.pdf. An additional source of uncertainty is the modeled water-surface elevations and depth for overbank areas due to limited calibration data during study period. Additional uncertainties and limitations pertinent to this study may be described elsewhere in U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2018-5048 by Julia G. Prokopec [https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/]., Access Constraints: None. This dataset is provided by USGS as a public service. Users of this geospatial database and geologic information derived there from should acknowledge the U.S. Geological Survey as the source of the data.
Bbox East Long -83.767
Bbox North Lat 42.488
Bbox South Lat 42.446
Bbox West Long -83.847
Coupled Resource
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The hydraulic model reflects the land-cover characteristics and any bridge, dam, levee, or other hydraulic structures existing as of December 2015. Unique meteorological factors (timing and distribution of precipitation) may cause actual streamflows along the modeled reach to vary from those assumed during a flood, which may lead to deviations in the water-surface elevations and inundation boundaries shown. Additional areas may be flooded due to unanticipated conditions such as changes in the streambed elevation or roughness, backwater into major tributaries along a main stem river, or backwater from localized debris or ice jams. The accuracy of the floodwater extent portrayed on these maps will vary with the accuracy of the digital elevation model used to simulate the land surface. 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Additional uncertainties and limitations pertinent to this study may be described elsewhere in U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2018-5048 by Julia G. Prokopec [https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/].\", \"Access Constraints: None. This dataset is provided by USGS as a public service. Users of this geospatial database and geologic information derived there from should acknowledge the U.S. Geological Survey as the source of the data.\"]", "temporal-extent-begin": "2014-10-20", "contact-email": "jprokopec@usgs.gov", "bbox-west-long": "-83.847", "metadata-date": "2018-03-27", "dataset-reference-date": "[{\"type\": \"publication\", \"value\": \"2018-01-01\"}]", "harvest_source_title": "DOI Open Data", "frequency-of-update": "notPlanned", "licence": "[\"The flood-inundation maps should not be used for navigation, regulatory, permitting, or other legal purposes. The USGS provides these maps \\u201cas-is\\u201d for a quick reference, emergency planning tool but assumes no legal liability or responsibility resulting from the use of this information. Although the flood-inundation maps represent the boundaries of inundated areas with a distinct line, some uncertainty is associated with these maps. The flood boundaries shown were estimated on the basis of water stages and streamflows at selected USGS streamgage. Water-surface elevations along the stream reaches were estimated by steady-state hydraulic modeling, assuming unobstructed flow, and using streamflows and hydrologic conditions anticipated at the USGS streamgage. The hydraulic model reflects the land-cover characteristics and any bridge, dam, levee, or other hydraulic structures existing as of December 2015. Unique meteorological factors (timing and distribution of precipitation) may cause actual streamflows along the modeled reach to vary from those assumed during a flood, which may lead to deviations in the water-surface elevations and inundation boundaries shown. Additional areas may be flooded due to unanticipated conditions such as changes in the streambed elevation or roughness, backwater into major tributaries along a main stem river, or backwater from localized debris or ice jams. The accuracy of the floodwater extent portrayed on these maps will vary with the accuracy of the digital elevation model used to simulate the land surface. If this series of flood-inundation maps will be used in conjunction with National Weather Service (NWS) river forecasts, the user should be aware of additional uncertainties that may be inherent or factored into NWS forecast procedures. The NWS uses forecast models to estimate the quantity and timing of water flowing through selected stream reaches in the United States. These forecast models (1) estimate the amount of runoff generated by precipitation and snowmelt, (2) simulate the movement of floodwater as it proceeds downstream, and (3) predict the flow and stage (and water-surface elevation) for the stream at a given location (AHPS forecast point) throughout the forecast period (every 6 hours and 3 to 5 days out in many locations). For more information on AHPS forecasts, please see http://water.weather.gov/ahps/pcpn_and_river_forecasting.pdf. 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Frequency Of Update notPlanned
Guid
Harvest Object Id 1e9c0ba5-17ab-4379-a683-2cb231201972
Harvest Source Id 5b7e4031-1e2d-428b-92e2-56554bbd7371
Harvest Source Title DOI Open Data
Licence The flood-inundation maps should not be used for navigation, regulatory, permitting, or other legal purposes. The USGS provides these maps \u201cas-is\u201d for a quick reference, emergency planning tool but assumes no legal liability or responsibility resulting from the use of this information. Although the flood-inundation maps represent the boundaries of inundated areas with a distinct line, some uncertainty is associated with these maps. The flood boundaries shown were estimated on the basis of water stages and streamflows at selected USGS streamgage. Water-surface elevations along the stream reaches were estimated by steady-state hydraulic modeling, assuming unobstructed flow, and using streamflows and hydrologic conditions anticipated at the USGS streamgage. The hydraulic model reflects the land-cover characteristics and any bridge, dam, levee, or other hydraulic structures existing as of December 2015. Unique meteorological factors (timing and distribution of precipitation) may cause actual streamflows along the modeled reach to vary from those assumed during a flood, which may lead to deviations in the water-surface elevations and inundation boundaries shown. Additional areas may be flooded due to unanticipated conditions such as changes in the streambed elevation or roughness, backwater into major tributaries along a main stem river, or backwater from localized debris or ice jams. The accuracy of the floodwater extent portrayed on these maps will vary with the accuracy of the digital elevation model used to simulate the land surface. If this series of flood-inundation maps will be used in conjunction with National Weather Service (NWS) river forecasts, the user should be aware of additional uncertainties that may be inherent or factored into NWS forecast procedures. The NWS uses forecast models to estimate the quantity and timing of water flowing through selected stream reaches in the United States. These forecast models (1) estimate the amount of runoff generated by precipitation and snowmelt, (2) simulate the movement of floodwater as it proceeds downstream, and (3) predict the flow and stage (and water-surface elevation) for the stream at a given location (AHPS forecast point) throughout the forecast period (every 6 hours and 3 to 5 days out in many locations). For more information on AHPS forecasts, please see http://water.weather.gov/ahps/pcpn_and_river_forecasting.pdf. Any use of trade, firm, or product names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
Metadata Language
Metadata Type geospatial
Progress completed
Spatial Data Service Type
Spatial Reference System
Spatial Harvester true
Temporal Extent Begin 2014-10-20
Temporal Extent End 2015-11-15

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