GAP/LANDFIRE National Terrestrial Ecosystems 2011

Metadata Updated: May 1, 2019

The GAP/LANDFIRE National Terrestrial Ecosystems represents a highly thematically detailed land cover map of the U.S. The GAP/LANDFIRE National Terrestrial Ecosystems dataset is produced by the U.S. Geological Survey in collaboration with the LANDFIRE Program. The GAP and LANDFIRE produce data and tools that help meet critical national challenges such as biodiversity conservation, fire and fuels modeling, renewable energy development, climate change adaptation, and infrastructure investment. The GAP National Terrestrial Ecosystems - Ver 3.0 is a 2011 update of the National Gap Analysis Program Land Cover Data - Version 2.2 for the conterminous U.S. The map legend includes types described by NatureServe's Ecological Systems Classification (Comer et al. 2002) as well as land use classes described in the National Land Cover Dataset 2011 (Homer et al. 2015). These data cover the entire continental U.S. and are a spatially continuous data layer. These raster data have a 30 m x 30 m cell resolution. National GAP Land Cover combines ecological system data from previous GAP projects in the Southwest , Southeast, and Northwest United States with recently updated California data. For Alaska and areas of the continental United States where ecological system-level GAP data has not yet been developed, data from the LANDFIRE project were used. This approach allowed GAP mappers to construct a seamless representation of ecological system distributions across the conterminous United States. Currently LANDFIRE is leading a remap effort based on 2016 Landsat imagery as well as new field data. In addition to the Ecological Systems Classification maps can be rendered using the Federal Geographic Data Committee’s National Vegetation Classification System at the Group level and higher.

Access & Use Information

License: No license information was provided. If this work was prepared by an officer or employee of the United States government as part of that person's official duties it is considered a U.S. Government Work.

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Dates

Metadata Date September 27, 2018
Metadata Created Date May 1, 2019
Metadata Updated Date May 1, 2019
Reference Date(s) May 13, 2016 (publication)
Frequency Of Update irregular

Metadata Source

Harvested from DOI CKAN Harvest Source

Additional Metadata

Resource Type Dataset
Metadata Date September 27, 2018
Metadata Created Date May 1, 2019
Metadata Updated Date May 1, 2019
Reference Date(s) May 13, 2016 (publication)
Responsible Party National Gap Analysis Program (Point of Contact)
Contact Email
Access Constraints Use Constraints: Inappropriate Uses: It is far easier to identify appropriate uses than inappropriate ones, however, there is a "fuzzy line" that is eventually crossed when the differences in resolution of the data, size of geographic area being analyzed, and precision of the answer required for the question are no longer compatible. Examples include: - Using the 2001 and 2011 land cover data sets to quantify change (see Data Use Constraints). -Using the data to map small areas (less than thousands of hectares), typically requiring mapping resolution at 1:24,000 scale and using aerial photographs or ground surveys. -Combining these data with other data finer than 1:100,000 scale to produce new hybrid maps or answer queries. -Generating specific areal measurements from the data finer than the nearest thousand hectares -Establishing exact boundaries for regulation or acquisition. -Establishing definite occurrence or non-occurrence of any feature for an exact geographic area -Determining abundance, health, or condition of any feature. -Establishing a measure of accuracy of any other data by comparison with GAP data. -Altering the data in any way and redistributing them as a GAP data product. -Using the data without acquiring and reviewing the metadata., Access Constraints: none
Bbox East Long -64.761475
Bbox North Lat 52.496415
Bbox South Lat 22.0670194
Bbox West Long -128.446443
Coupled Resource
Frequency Of Update irregular
Guid
Harvest Object Id cd0044d6-e905-4f59-aac1-098bd2d28af1
Harvest Source Id 34ce571b-cb98-4e0b-979f-30f9ecc452c5
Harvest Source Title DOI CKAN Harvest Source
Licence Inappropriate Uses: It is far easier to identify appropriate uses than inappropriate ones, however, there is a "fuzzy line" that is eventually crossed when the differences in resolution of the data, size of geographic area being analyzed, and precision of the answer required for the question are no longer compatible. Examples include: - Using the 2001 and 2011 data to quantify change (see Data Use Constraints). -Using the data to map small areas (less than thousands of hectares), typically requiring mapping resolution at 1:24,000 scale and using aerial photographs or ground surveys. -Combining these data with other data finer than 1:100,000 scale to produce new hybrid maps or answer queries. -Generating specific areal measurements from the data finer than the nearest thousand hectares -Establishing exact boundaries for regulation or acquisition. -Establishing definite occurrence or non-occurrence of any feature for an exact geographic area -Determining abundance, health, or condition of any feature. -Establishing a measure of accuracy of any other data by comparison with GAP data. -Altering the data in any way and redistributing them as a GAP data product. -Using the data without acquiring and reviewing the metadata. Inappropriate Uses: It is far easier to identify appropriate uses than inappropriate ones, however, there is a "fuzzy line" that is eventually crossed when the differences in resolution of the data, size of geographic area being analyzed, and precision of the answer required for the question are no longer compatible. Examples include: - Using the 2001 and 2011 data to quantify change (see Data Use Constraints). -Using the data to map small areas (less than thousands of hectares), typically requiring mapping resolution at 1:24,000 scale and using aerial photographs or ground surveys. -Combining these data with other data finer than 1:100,000 scale to produce new hybrid maps or answer queries. -Generating specific areal measurements from the data finer than the nearest thousand hectares -Establishing exact boundaries for regulation or acquisition. -Establishing definite occurrence or non-occurrence of any feature for an exact geographic area -Determining abundance, health, or condition of any feature. -Establishing a measure of accuracy of any other data by comparison with GAP data. -Altering the data in any way and redistributing them as a GAP data product. -Using the data without acquiring and reviewing the metadata. Inappropriate Uses: It is far easier to identify appropriate uses than inappropriate ones, however, there is a "fuzzy line" that is eventually crossed when the differences in resolution of the data, size of geographic area being analyzed, and precision of the answer required for the question are no longer compatible. Examples include: - Using the 2001 and 2011 data to quantify change (see Data Use Constraints). -Using the data to map small areas (less than thousands of hectares), typically requiring mapping resolution at 1:24,000 scale and using aerial photographs or ground surveys. -Combining these data with other data finer than 1:100,000 scale to produce new hybrid maps or answer queries. -Generating specific areal measurements from the data finer than the nearest thousand hectares -Establishing exact boundaries for regulation or acquisition. -Establishing definite occurrence or non-occurrence of any feature for an exact geographic area -Determining abundance, health, or condition of any feature. -Establishing a measure of accuracy of any other data by comparison with GAP data. -Altering the data in any way and redistributing them as a GAP data product. -Using the data without acquiring and reviewing the metadata. Inappropriate Uses: It is far easier to identify appropriate uses than inappropriate ones, however, there is a "fuzzy line" that is eventually crossed when the differences in resolution of the data, size of geographic area being analyzed, and precision of the answer required for the question are no longer compatible. Examples include: - Using the 2001 and 2011 data to quantify change (see Data Use Constraints). -Using the data to map small areas (less than thousands of hectares), typically requiring mapping resolution at 1:24,000 scale and using aerial photographs or ground surveys. -Combining these data with other data finer than 1:100,000 scale to produce new hybrid maps or answer queries. -Generating specific areal measurements from the data finer than the nearest thousand hectares -Establishing exact boundaries for regulation or acquisition. -Establishing definite occurrence or non-occurrence of any feature for an exact geographic area -Determining abundance, health, or condition of any feature. -Establishing a measure of accuracy of any other data by comparison with GAP data. -Altering the data in any way and redistributing them as a GAP data product. -Using the data without acquiring and reviewing the metadata. Inappropriate Uses: It is far easier to identify appropriate uses than inappropriate ones, however, there is a "fuzzy line" that is eventually crossed when the differences in resolution of the data, size of geographic area being analyzed, and precision of the answer required for the question are no longer compatible. Examples include: - Using the 2001 and 2011 data to quantify change (see Data Use Constraints). -Using the data to map small areas (less than thousands of hectares), typically requiring mapping resolution at 1:24,000 scale and using aerial photographs or ground surveys. -Combining these data with other data finer than 1:100,000 scale to produce new hybrid maps or answer queries. -Generating specific areal measurements from the data finer than the nearest thousand hectares -Establishing exact boundaries for regulation or acquisition. -Establishing definite occurrence or non-occurrence of any feature for an exact geographic area -Determining abundance, health, or condition of any feature. -Establishing a measure of accuracy of any other data by comparison with GAP data. -Altering the data in any way and redistributing them as a GAP data product. -Using the data without acquiring and reviewing the metadata. Inappropriate Uses: It is far easier to identify appropriate uses than inappropriate ones, however, there is a "fuzzy line" that is eventually crossed when the differences in resolution of the data, size of geographic area being analyzed, and precision of the answer required for the question are no longer compatible. Examples include: - Using the 2001 and 2011 data to quantify change (see Data Use Constraints). -Using the data to map small areas (less than thousands of hectares), typically requiring mapping resolution at 1:24,000 scale and using aerial photographs or ground surveys. -Combining these data with other data finer than 1:100,000 scale to produce new hybrid maps or answer queries. -Generating specific areal measurements from the data finer than the nearest thousand hectares -Establishing exact boundaries for regulation or acquisition. -Establishing definite occurrence or non-occurrence of any feature for an exact geographic area -Determining abundance, health, or condition of any feature. -Establishing a measure of accuracy of any other data by comparison with GAP data. -Altering the data in any way and redistributing them as a GAP data product. -Using the data without acquiring and reviewing the metadata. Inappropriate Uses: It is far easier to identify appropriate uses than inappropriate ones, however, there is a "fuzzy line" that is eventually crossed when the differences in resolution of the data, size of geographic area being analyzed, and precision of the answer required for the question are no longer compatible. Examples include: - Using the 2001 and 2011 data to quantify change (see Data Use Constraints). -Using the data to map small areas (less than thousands of hectares), typically requiring mapping resolution at 1:24,000 scale and using aerial photographs or ground surveys. -Combining these data with other data finer than 1:100,000 scale to produce new hybrid maps or answer queries. -Generating specific areal measurements from the data finer than the nearest thousand hectares -Establishing exact boundaries for regulation or acquisition. -Establishing definite occurrence or non-occurrence of any feature for an exact geographic area -Determining abundance, health, or condition of any feature. -Establishing a measure of accuracy of any other data by comparison with GAP data. -Altering the data in any way and redistributing them as a GAP data product. -Using the data without acquiring and reviewing the metadata.
Metadata Language
Metadata Type geospatial
Progress underDevelopment
Spatial Data Service Type
Spatial Reference System
Spatial Harvester true
Temporal Extent Begin 2010-01-01
Temporal Extent End 2011-01-01

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